Camp near Somerset, Ky.
Jan. 21st, 1862
Sir:
.....I have been requested to write you a few lines....giving a brief account of the battle that was fought at Logan's Cross Roads, "alias Fishing Creek" on Sunday, the 19th inst.  The battle was commenced about 7 o'clock in the morning by the Rebels.  They first fired upon our pickets who were compelled to retreat until re-inforced.  The battle lasted four hours, when the enemy retreated in great haste to reach their intrenchments.
Dear Lizzie
.....I have written you several hasty letters in a few days past, and at no time giving you any thing in detail, nor will now or perhaps ever attempt to do so.  Our defeat in the Northern papers is styled Bull Run Jr.  It was certainly bad enough, bad enough.  From Mill Spring to Monticello ten or twelve miles the road was strewn with knapsacks and blankets sufficient to have carpeted the road.  The loss in killed was not so heavy as supposed only 43 in (15th) Mississippi regiment which was by far the greatest suffered. 
No. 19
You will have to pay the postage on this for I am out of money and stamps.
George
Camp Cumberland
Jan. 29, 1862
Dear Friends at home,
.....A rainy day and feeling I could do little better, as we have nothing to read induces me to keep on writing, tho I assure you the melancholy reflection that you will not see it (the letter) in 15 or 20 days is rather cooling to my sanguine feelings.

CAMP GOGGIN, December 2, 1861

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Eastern Division

GENERAL:  I arrived here yesterday, reconnoitered same day and today.  This morning the enemy opened fire from three pieces, one rifled, and infantry on Colonel Haskins' camp subsequent to my order for the removal of the camp some distance back.

LOUISVILLE, January 20, 1862

Major-General MC CLELLAN,Commanding U. S. Army:

.....By telegraphic dispatches from the command of General G. H. Thomas, whom I had ordered to form a junction with General Schoepf at Somerset and attack Zollicoffer, I have information that General Thomas was attacked by Zollicoffer's forces at 6 o'clock yesterday morning, some 8 miles west of Somerset. 

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO

SOMERSET, Ky., January 31, 1862

Capt. J. B. FRY, A. A. G., Chief of Staff Hdqrs. Dept. Ohio, Louisville, Ky.

.....CAPTAIN:  I have the honor to report that in carrying out the instructions of the general commanding the department, contained in his communication of the 29th of December, I reached Logan's Cross-Roads, about 10 miles north of the entrenched camp of the enemy on the Cumberland River, on the 17th instant, with a portion of the Second and Third Brigades, Kenny's battery of artillery and a battalion of Wolford's cavalry.

HDQRS. SECOND BRIG., FIRST DIV., DEPT OF THE OHIO

Camp near Mill Springs, January 27, 1862

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS,Commanding First Division, Department of the Ohio

.....SIR:  I have the honor to transmit to you the following report of the part taken by the Second Brigade in the engagement with the enemy at Logan's field, on the 19th instant.

ZOLLICOFFER'S CAMP, WAYNE COUNTY, Ky.

January 25, 1862

Col. M. D. MANSON,Comdg. Second Brigade, First Division, Department of the Ohio

.....SIR:  In compliance with your orders I herewith transmit my report of the part my regiment took in the engagement with the enemy on the 19th instant.

HDQRS. TENTH REGIMENT KENTUCKY VOLUNTEERS

Near Mill Springs, Wayne County, Ky., January 27, 1862

Col. M. D. MANSON,Comdg. Second Brigade, First Division, Department of the Ohio

.....SIR:  I submit the following report of the action of my regiment in connection with the capture of the fortifications erected by the rebel Army at and near Mill Springs.

CAMP OPPOSITE MILL SPRINGS, WAYNE COUNTY, Ky.

January 23, 1862

Col. M. D. MANSON,Comdg. Second Brigade, First Division, Department of the Ohio

.....SIR:  I have the honor to report to you the part taken by the Tenth Regiment of Indiana Volunteers, under my command, in the battle fought on the 19th instant, at Logan's farm, Pulaski County, Kentucky.

HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., FIRST DIV., DEPT. OF THE OHIO

Somerset, January 27, 1862

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS,Commanding First Division

.....SIR:  I have the honor respectfully to submit the following report of the part which my brigade took in the battle of the Cumberland on the 19th instant.

HDQRS. SECOND REGIMENT MINNESOTA VOLUNTEERS

Camp Hamilton, Ky., January 22, 1862

Col. ROBERT L. McCOOK, Ninth Ohio, Comdg. Third Brig., First Div., Dept. of the Ohio

.....SIR:  I have the honor herewith to submit my report of the part taken by the Second Minnesota Regiment in the action of the Cumberland, on the 19th instant.

CAMP HAMILTON

Pulaski County, Ky., January 22, 1862

Col. ROBERT L. McCOOK, Ninth Ohio, Comdg. Third Brig., First Div., Dept. of the Ohio

.....SIR:  The bugle called the Ninth Regiment Ohio Volunteers together on the merging of the 19th instant about 7 o'clock.  Led by Acting Lieutenant-Colonel Kammerling, the regiment was marched out of camp to <ar7_96> meet the enemy, who was reported approaching against us on the road leading them [from] the Cumberland River to Logan's farm.

HEADQUARTERS TWELFTH BRIGADE

Somerset, Ky., January 30, 1862

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Department of the Ohio

.....GENERAL:  I have the honor to submit the following report of the action of the First and Second Tennessee and Twelfth Kentucky Regiments Volunteers in the engagement of the 19th instant.

HDQRS. TWELFTH REGIMENT KENTUCKY VOLUNTEERS

Waitsborough, January 26, 1862

Capt. G. E. FLYNT, Assistant Adjutant-General

.....CAPTAIN:  In obedience to the order of Brig. Gen. G. H. Thomas of this date, I respectfully submit the following report of the humble part performed by the Twelfth Regiment of Kentucky Volunteers, under my command, in the engagement of Logan's fields on the 19th instant, as also on the subsequent day, in the storming the fortifications at Beech Grove.

Camp Brents, January 22, 1862

General THOMAS

.....GENERAL:  At daylight on Sunday morning, the 19th, my pickets, sent in obedience to your order in the direction of Mill Springs, came in contact with the advance of the enemy and fired on them.  I immediately sent word to Colonel Manson, and proceeded with my command to the relief of my picket.

Somerset, January 26, 1862

Brigadier-General THOMAS

.....SIR:  On the morning of the 19th at 7 a.m. heard pickets firing in the advance of the Tenth Indiana camp.  My horses being in harness, ordered one section, under charge of Lieutenant Bennett, on the road by the Tenth Indiana camp.  Moved two sections through the fields.  Advanced into the woods.

January 25, 1862

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Department of the Ohio

.....SIR:  On the morning of January 19 my battery was encamped at Logan's Cross-Roads, and was turned out about 7 a.m. by the reports of sharp firing by the out-pickets of the Tenth Indiana Regiment.  I placed my battery in position on a ridge running parallel with the belt of woods in which our forces were engaging the enemy, and about 20 yards distant, to cover the Tenth Indiana, which I was informed was falling back. 

WAR DEPARTMENT, January 22, 1862

.....The President, Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy, has received information of a brilliant victory by the United States forces over a large body of armed traitors and rebels at Mill Springs, in the State of Kentucky.  He returns thanks to the gallant officers and soldiers who won that victory, and when the official reports shall be received, the military and personal valor displayed in battle will be acknowledged and rewarded in a fitting manner.

Bowling Green, Ky., January 22, 1862

To J. P. BENJAMIN

The following dispatch just received from Nashville:

.....General Crittenden, with eight regiments of infantry and six pieces of artillery, attacked the enemy on Sunday morning, 19th instant, 7 o'clock, in strong position on Fishing Creek, 11 miles from Mill Springs.  The attack was repulsed by superior numbers, and a disorderly retreat commenced after General Zollicoffer fell.

HEADQUARTERS

Beech Grove, Ky., January 18, 1862

To the ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters Department of the West

.....SIR:  I am threatened by a superior force of the enemy in front, and finding it impossible to cross the river, I will have to make the fight on the ground I now occupy.

.....If you can do so, I would ask that a diversion be made in my favor.

HDQRS. SECOND BRIGADE DIVISION, C.S. ARMY

Gainesborough, Tenn., February 1, 1862

Major-General CRITTENDEN, Commanding Division

.....GENERAL:  I embrace the first leisure moment, after receiving reports from the different commanding officers of this brigade, to lay before you an account of the operations of my command in the engagement with the enemy near Fishing Creek, Kentucky, on the morning of January 19.

CAMP NEAR GAINESBOROUGH, TENN.

February 2, 1862

Brigadier-General CARROLL

.....SIR:  In compliance with your order I submit a statement of the movements and casualties of the Twenty-ninth Tennessee Regiment.

.....This regiment was under command of Colonel Samuel Powell, and in the order of march from camp to the field was in the last of your brigade, except Colonel Wood's (Alabama) regiment, which was held in reserve.  When the fight commenced it was on this side of the branch, near the house afterwards occupied as a hospital for our wounded.

LEBANON, December 12, 1861

Brig. Gen. D. C. Buell:

.....Dispatch from General Boyle just received.  His spy sent to Mill Springs, just returned, reports enemy not over 7,500 strong, according to their statement.  Spy believes these are not over 6,500.  He was through their camp.  They have but eight pieces of artillery.

Lebanon, Ky.,

December 3, 1861---11 p.m.

General D. C. BUELL, Headquarters, Louisville:

.....I have just received a dispatch from General Schoepf.  The enemy are opposite Somerset and have commenced cannonading Hoskins' camp.  He says the strength of the enemy is estimated, from the best accounts he can get, of the following numbers:  At Mill Springs, 2,000 infantry and 1,000 cavalry at Captain Wiatt's farm.  2 miles from Mill Springs, 1,000 infantry at Steubenville.

Lebanon, Ky.,

December 14, 1861

Brigadier-General BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

.....I have received no letter from General Schoepf since the 10th.  An officer was here yesterday direct from the Thirty-fifth Ohio.  He left Somerset on the 12th.  General Schoepf [believed on] road at that time that the enemy was returning across the Cumberland, but he could get no positive information, as he could not rely on his cavalry. 

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky.

January 8, 1862

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 4 

VII. The following organization of brigades will be observed until further orders:

BRIGADE HEADQUARTERS,

Kentucky Line near Albany, November 24, 1861

Lieutenant-Colonel MACKALLAssistant Adjutant-General, Bowling Green, Ky.

SIR:  Colonel Stanton's regiment will probably camp at Monticello tonight; Colonel Murray's about 12 miles distant from Monticello, towards Albany.  They have with them five cavalry companies, with which they are ordered to seize the ferry-boats at the crossing of the Cumberland.

EXCERPTED FROM THE SPENCER TALLEY MEMOIRS

.....Our company came together as often as we could in practice in drilling and to be posted as to the prospect of getting into camp "life" or as one would say in that age of the world.  John P. Murray of Gainesboro a prominent citizen and lawyer of Jackson county was forming a regiment at Livingston and Gov. Isham G. Harris learning of our readiness ordered us into that camp.

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